Category: News

08 Jun 2016

Angelina Jolie-Pitt appointed visiting professor at London School of Economics

The US actress, film director and special envoy for the UNHCR, the UN refugee agency has been appointed visiting professor at the London School of Economics (LSE), where she will teach a Masters in gender and human rights.

The Oscar-winning actress will join former foreign secretary William Hague as a lecturer at the university’s Centre for Women, Peace and Security where she will help to teach students studying for a Master’s degree.

Jolie-Pitt, who has been a goodwill ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency and is currently one of its special envoys, has been a vocal campaigner on refugee rights and gender based violence. Jolie-Pitt will serve as a guest editor of BBC Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour later this month to be aired on 17th June, where she will explore the refugee crisis in the lead-up to World Refugee Day the following Monday.

Jolie-Pitt said “I am looking forward to teaching and to learning from the students as well as to sharing my own experiences of working alongside governments and the United Nations”.

Hague said: “This course will help underpin our work in preventing violence in conflict, developing expertise and research to assist us in tackling the culture of impunity. I look forward to working with the LSE students and my fellow visiting professors.”

The one year course will include modules on Women, Peace and Security, Gender and Militarisation and Gender and Human Rights.

 

07 Jun 2016

AFRICA WRITES RETURNS THIS SUMMER

Africa Writes is the Royal African Society’s annual literature festival. Celebrating its 5th year, Africa Writes 2016 brings together over 50 distinguished authors, poets, publishers and experts for a stimulating and inspiring three days. Every year Africa Writes showcases established and emerging talent from the African continent and its diaspora in what is now the UK’s biggest celebration of contemporary African writing taking place over an exciting summer weekend. The festival features book launches, readings, author appearances, panel discussions, youth and children’s workshop among other thought-provoking happenings and engaging activities.

Click here to find out more about the festival!

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03 Jun 2016

Boys Who Live With Books ‘Earn More as Adults’

“A room without books is like a body without a soul,” words of Roman philosopher, Cicero.

New research has uncovered a strong correlation between the earnings of adults and whether they grew up surrounded by books as children.

Three economists at the University of Padua studied 6,000 men born in nine European countries and concluded that children with access to books could expect to earn materially more than those who grow up with few or no books.

They studied the period from 1920 to 1956, when school reforms saw the minimum school leaving age raised across Europe. They looked at whether, at the age of 10, a child lived in a house with fewer than 10 books, a shelf of books, a bookcase with up to 100 books, two bookcases, or more than two bookcases.

Over the period studied, the research, published in the Economic Journal, found that an additional year of education increased a man’s average lifetime earnings by 9%.

Men brought up in households with less than a shelf of books earned only 5% more as a result of the extra year’s education, compared with 21% more for those who had access to a lot of books. And those that had access to books were more likely to move to the better-earning opportunities in cities than those without books.

The men’s first job was also much more likely to be a white-collar job.

Books matter because they encourage children to read more and reading can have positive effects on school performance. A home filled with books indicates advantageous socio-economic conditions.  This may indicate that a home with books encourages cognitive and socio-emotional skills, which are important for economic success in life.